DOES YOUR CHILD OFTEN EXPRESS HOW MUCH THEY DISLIKE MATH?

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Math doesn't have to be their favourite subject, but if the mere sight of a math equation causes your child to show signs of anxiety, it might be an indication that they need to start building their math confidence.

Rock At Math

HERE ARE 5 TIPS FOR HOW PARENTS CAN HELP CHILDREN INCREASE THEIR PRIDE AND CONFIDENCE IN THEIR MATH KNOWLEDGE.

1. ENCOURAGE A GROWTH MINDSET:

A growth mindset means you believe your skills can be improved through effort and problem-solving. You can intentionally encourage a growth mindset when you remind your child that learning is a process that takes time and practice, or that mistakes are often how we learn the most.

When your child does well in math, praise them for the effort they put in, the different strategies they tried, and use other growth mindset language instead of celebrating intelligence. When they struggle, point out things that have been hard in the past that they can now do easily. It's all about building confidence through emphasizing learning as a process, not an outcome.

More ideas on growth mindset language:

ENCOURAGE A GROWTH MINDSET
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BE MINDFUL OF YOUR OWN ATTITUDE TOWARDS MATH

2. BE MINDFUL OF YOUR OWN ATTITUDE TOWARDS MATH:

If a child hears a parent say they "suck at math too", this can be damaging to their long-term confidence as they think it's acceptable to brush off math as something no one in their family is good at. This kind of reaction to math without any mention of trying or wanting to improve can also make children believe that it's not important to get better at math.

How do you talk about math and your own experience with it? Do you display a growth mindset? Do you see value in math? If not, work on building your very own growth mindset and try learning strategies with your child.

3. NORMALIZE THE LEARNING PIT:

No one likes to be stuck in the 'learning pit' where solving problems can become increasingly frustrating and confusing the more children try. By reminding your child that it is normal to get stuck and make mistakes when problem-solving, you give them permission to be patient with themselves and try all avenues before reaching out for help.

NORMALIZE THE LEARNING PIT
POINT OUT AND CELEBRATE WAYS YOU AND YOUR CHILD USES MATH EVERYDAY

4. POINT OUT AND CELEBRATE WAYS YOU AND YOUR CHILD USES MATH EVERYDAY:

When you notice yourself doing math in your head, speak it out loud to involve your child.

e.g. "This recipe asks for 3/4 cups, but we only have a 1/4 cup. What are we going to do?" or "Your hockey game in Tignish starts at 6pm. What time do we need to leave home?"

They will gain confidence in seeing themselves using it successfully in real life, will develop a more broad understanding of math, and will appreciate it more than if they only see it as abstract problems on a worksheet.

5. FIND OPPORTUNITIES TO MAKE MATH FUN!

Play games that use math, look for patterns, mention when math is involved in fun activities you're doing like baking or making art.

Incorporating math games into your family routines can be a surprising way to motivate your child, and show them that they can grasp mathematical concepts. Even games like Monopoly, chess, card games and Yahtzee can improve mathematics capacity.

FIND OPPORTUNITIES TO MAKE MATH FUN!

As a parent, it's important to encourage your child to build their confidence in math. Confidence and a growth mindset allows children to understand the value of making mistakes and develop a willingness to take risks in order to achieve success!